Muscle Guarding

Muscle Guarding

Are you a well-conditioned athlete or a weekend warrior that likes to try new work out regimens on the weekend?  Unfortunately, Muscle Guarding is a very common complaint amongst these individuals that should be addressed to the utmost extent to prevent further injury and insult to the muscles.  Many times Muscle Guarding is due to the spinal column being out of alignment.  This is known as a spinal subluxation.  A spinal subluxation is less than a complete dislocation of a joint that causes nervous system interference.  This may further put pressure on the nerves surrounding the bones and cause pain and local inflammation.  The subluxation may be removed through a spinal adjustment through licensed chiropractic physician.  They will utilize their hands to correct the bone accordingly to the specific line of drive needed to correct it.  Typically this line of drive is a posterior to anterior, inferior to superior thrust.  Sometimes a medial to lateral thrust is also needed.

Treatment

Other treatments for Muscle Guarding include but are not limited to the following: physiotherapy modalities such as: ultrasound, cold laser therapy, electrical muscles stimulation, cryotherapy, moist heat application, diathermy application, and more.  Other traditional treatments for Muscle Guarding include: massage therapy, acupuncture, stretching, physical therapy, exercise, and more.  Massage therapy and Chiropractic care go hand in hand for patients with Muscle Guarding.  The massage therapists work tiredly to decrease the muscle hypertonicity within the spine well enough for the chiropractic physician to deliver an ample adjustment to the area as to correct the subluxation.  Some stretching techniques that are useful include ART (Active Release Technique) and PNF (Post Neuro-facilitation) technique.  These help to relax the muscle enough to deliver an adequate stretch to the muscle fibers.  In these techniques, the patient is actively participating in their stretching regimen with the doctor or therapist leading the stretch.  These stretches allow for the patient’s muscles to relax enough to overcome the guarding and allow for them to get more of a stretch than otherwise attempting this on their own.  Post stretching it is very crucial that the patient drink an adequate amount of water.  This means at least half of their body weight in ounces per day; however, more needs to be drunk when they exercise because they are hopefully just sweating the water out anyways.  There are mineral waters out there that contain different vitamins and minerals which aid in rehydrating the disc, muscles, and the ligaments.  This is very important for regeneration and Muscle Guarding.